Jump to: navigation, search

Sign of Robin Hood (Queen Street, Oxford)

Locality
Coordinates 51.751666666667, -1.2591666666667
Adm. div. Oxfordshire
Vicinity 33-35 Queen Street, Oxford
Type Public house
Interest Robin Hood name
Status Defunct
First Record 1674
Loading map...
Approximate location of the Robin Hood in 1674.
The broken line on Great Bayly Street (which extends left from the centre and was later renamed Queen Street) indicates the course of Buther Row on this detail from 'Plan of Oxford shewing the Position of the Ancient Halls &c. according to Wood' / Frontispiece in Wood, Anthony; Clark, Andrew, ed. Survey of the Antiquities of the City of Oxford, composed in 1661-6 (Oxford Historical Society, vols. 15, 17, 37) (Oxford, 1889-99), vol. I (click image to enlarge).
Queen Street 33-35. The Sign of the Robin Hood occupied part of the area now covered by the red-brick building (with the two shops) and the pavement in front of it / Google Earth Street View.

By Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2017-02-18. Revised by Henrik Thiil Nielsen, 2017-09-01.

The Sign of the Robin Hood was located in Butcher Row, which was later extended, widened and renamed first Great Bayly Street, then Queen Street. The tavern would have been located, at least in part, on the area covered by the pavement in front of the red-brick building (Queen Street 33-35) seen in the Google Street View photo shown elsewhere on this page.[1] The property was owned by Balliol College, whose bursar noted details about leases, fines and rents in his Fine Book, begun about 1670. His entry on the property on part of which the Robin Hood was located must have been written some years after 1674 for the words "in 1674 (and so at the present)" to make sense (see Record cited below). His entries stop in 1686, when another hand takes over and the entries become less interesting and detailed.[2] While the record makes it clear that the sign of the Robin Hood, run by Robert Gardiner, was in business by 1674 and had gone out of business by 1686, it is not clear from the bursar's entry how long it had existed by the former date. As the buildings erected on this land were not quite finished on 3 June 1657, the tavern could hardly have opened much earlier. A lease dated 27 April 1676 lists 'Robert Gardiner' as 'victular',[3] so the Robin Hood was evidently still in business at that time.

Records

1686 - Sign of Robin Hood (Queen Street, Oxford)

[1686:]
[...] in 1674 (and so at the present) the premises were let for about £44 per annum, as I received it from the several tenants viz.

For the tenements next the street

 I & 2, Two tenements in the west part of the building towards St. Peter's church in the possession of George Steynor, a sarjeant of the City, the yearly rent was £9
 3. For the house adjoining to Steynors and on the left hand of the passage leading into the backside, then in the tenure of William Durling, boddyes-maker. £7
 4. On the right side of the passage aforesaid one Michael Parker, a cooper, had the shop for which he paid £3
 But the rest of the tenement lying behind the said shop was inhabited by one John Wigge, a shoemaker, for which he paid £5 [p. 351:]
 5. For the tenement adjoining to the Cross Keys, wherein Robert Gardiner the city bell-man then dwelt and kept the sign of the Robbin Hood £7[4]

Gazetteers

Sources

Maps

Maps of Oxford, focused on Queen Street. The tavern is not indicated.

Background

Also see

Notes